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-   -   A very MindRomp biological sciences thread (http://mindromp.org/forum/showthread.php?t=2560)

MSG 10th April 2015 10:43 AM

A very MindRomp biological sciences thread
 
... with a very MindRomp thread starter...

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CCOG7P9UsAAVaDo.jpg:large

Quote:

Meet the world's newest monkey. The white-cheeked macaque, Macaca leucogenys, has been discovered in south-eastern Tibet, in biodiverse yet poorly studied forests in the politically volatile area.

It is distinguished from the other four macaque species in the region by its rounded glans penis and a dark, hairy scrotum. Other macaques there have a spear-shaped glans penis and white scrotums. It also has thick, long hair around its neck, unlike the other four species.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/...l#.VSeagfmUeiJ

Magicziggy 10th April 2015 10:45 AM

It's worst move was to get itself discovered.

MSG 10th April 2015 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Magicziggy (Post 236323)
It's

:whatisthisshit:

gib 10th April 2015 11:04 AM

I would of thought that a hairy scrotum defeats the purpose of a scrotum.

nostrum 10th April 2015 11:13 AM

What is the purpose of a scrotum

Timewave 10th April 2015 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nostrum (Post 236343)
What is the purpose of a scrotum

temperature control

OmicronPersei8 10th April 2015 01:03 PM

Now the monkeys tell each other about the day the greatest gods descended upon them and felt up their scrotums and dicks.

Brother Daniel 10th April 2015 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gib (Post 236332)
would of

:whatisthisshit:

gib 10th April 2015 01:50 PM

that was for msg m8

Brother Daniel 10th April 2015 01:52 PM

oh ok

gib 10th April 2015 01:54 PM

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v1..._gaycowboy.gif

Adenosine 10th April 2015 02:32 PM

In other Mindromp biological science news the first full body transplant is going ahead.

*snigger*

Not even kidding. They even have a volunteer, some crazy Russian guy.

Wait, oxymoron there. Some Russian guy.

Brother Daniel 10th April 2015 03:55 PM

You're looking for "redundancy" or "tautology" or some such thing, rather than "oxymoron", right?

Imp 10th April 2015 05:51 PM

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Taggrammer nazi's..

Dionysus 10th April 2015 06:14 PM

'Nazis' should properly be capitalised and no apostrophe.

Imp 10th April 2015 06:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dionysus (Post 236381)
'Nazis' should properly be capitalised and no apostrophe.

You're missing 3. Poor effort. :nono:

Dionysus 10th April 2015 09:25 PM

That's not all I'm missing but we needn't dwell on that eh.

nostrum 10th April 2015 09:50 PM

"Eh." is not a proper way to end a sentence. I'm just saying.

charmz 10th April 2015 10:08 PM

Eh?

Adenosine 10th April 2015 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imp (Post 236380)
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Taggrammer nazi's..

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dionysus (Post 236381)
'Nazis' should properly be capitalised and no apostrophe.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imp (Post 236383)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dionysus (Post 236381)
'Nazis' should properly be capitalised and no apostrophe.

You're missing 3. Poor effort. :nono:

lol

G should have been capitalised, grammar was spelt wrong and the ellipsis is missing a ".".

charmz 10th April 2015 11:42 PM

Triticum spelta

borealis 11th April 2015 01:08 AM

Sounds wheaty, charmzzzz.

MSG 11th April 2015 01:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brother Daniel (Post 236355)
Quote:

Originally Posted by gib (Post 236332)
would of

:whatisthisshit:

:trapsprung:

MSG 11th April 2015 01:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gib (Post 236332)
I would of thought that a hairy scrotum defeats the purpose of a scrotum.

Not in Tibet it doesn't

MSG 11th April 2015 01:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imp (Post 236383)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dionysus (Post 236381)
'Nazis' should properly be capitalised and no apostrophe.

You're missing 3. Poor effort. :nono:

*your

Brother Daniel 11th April 2015 01:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nostrum (Post 236385)
"Eh." is not a proper way to end a sentence. I'm just saying.

It is in Canada!

borealis 11th April 2015 01:26 AM

I concur with Brother Dan'l.

Because he's right, eh?

Timewave 11th April 2015 01:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 236415)
I concur with Brother Dan'l.

Because he's right, eh?

I thought it was pure queenslander lingo to finish every sentence with a question?
Hey?

borealis 11th April 2015 02:03 AM

Canadians are reknowned for ending many statements with an eh? query. "Nice day, eh?"

ETA: We did send a whole slew of Nova Scotians to Australia sometime in the 1800s. I'm sure they added something to the regional accents, but can't recall where they went geographically atm.

MSG 11th April 2015 02:15 AM

some of them must have gone to New Zealand eh?

borealis 11th April 2015 02:21 AM

They did, yes.

There was a bunch from Pictou, I think, went to New Zealand, eh?

Timewave 11th April 2015 04:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 236434)
Canadians are reknowned for ending many statements with an eh? query. "Nice day, eh?"

ETA: We did send a whole slew of Nova Scotians to Australia sometime in the 1800s. I'm sure they added something to the regional accents, but can't recall where they went geographically atm.

Ya reckon?
Nah mate, we done feed them to the sharks, Ya know?
I reckon ya kidden ya self that you tribe of heathens had any influence on our tribe of good christians convicts. Right?
They were probably mixed breeds, an gone native, if not down right indians,ya know what I'm saying? Hey?

Timewave 11th April 2015 04:21 AM

Now the possibility, that our there cunning christian convicts done escaped and fled to nova scotia an improved your cultural base with fresh blood an ideas is, Like, Ya Know? a real, You hearing what I'm telling you Girl?
That there is the far more plausible idea ifn ya wantin to inta anticedents. Right? You understanding what I saying? Yes?

gib 11th April 2015 01:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Timewave (Post 236428)
Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 236415)
I concur with Brother Dan'l.

Because he's right, eh?

I thought it was pure queenslander lingo to finish every sentence with a question?
Hey?

pretty common elsewhere innit

Dionysus 12th April 2015 12:46 AM

Mais oui n'est-ce pas eh.

MondoVman 13th April 2015 06:35 PM

another successful science derail, eh?

Zeluvia 13th April 2015 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MondoVman (Post 237077)
another successful science derail, eh?

it started out with hairy scrotums, could hardly expect anything less...


hey Nazi's what is the plural of scrotum? scrotii?

MSG 13th April 2015 08:25 PM

scrota, I would have thought

Brother Daniel 13th April 2015 08:27 PM

"scrota" is right, but "scrotums" is also acceptable, according to Webster.

borealis 13th April 2015 09:27 PM

I don't think I've ever had the need to refer to them in the plural.

(borrowing: innocence and light)

Dionysus 13th April 2015 09:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zeluvia (Post 237086)
Quote:

Originally Posted by MondoVman (Post 237077)
another successful science derail, eh?

it started out with hairy scrotums, could hardly expect anything less...


hey Nazi's what is the plural of scrotum? scrotii?

Bless my giant hairy scrotum! One Nazi, two Nazis, no apostrophes. For examples of apostrophe use with male National Socialists and their genitalia try the following sentences.

That Nazi's scrotum is loose.
These Nazis' scrota are tight.

Adenosine 13th April 2015 09:57 PM

Wouldn't they be scroto because they're male? Feminine words are ended in "a".

Dionysus 13th April 2015 10:03 PM

Bollo

Requiem 13th April 2015 11:32 PM

scrotagliata

Requiem 13th April 2015 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dionysus (Post 237122)
Bollo

lol

there was a stupid mickey take of In The Ghetto back in the day, by some Saturday night TV duo, where a kick in the balls was rendered "In the Bollo". Another one of those go-to references of mine. You have a knack of finding them (or I happen to have an awful lot more than the average -- probably a lot of both).

Requiem 13th April 2015 11:42 PM

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Tagcirque du scrotesque

gib 14th April 2015 10:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Adenosine (Post 237118)
Wouldn't they be scroto because they're male? Feminine words are ended in "a".

please tell me you're joking

Adenosine 14th April 2015 10:08 AM

No giba, I'm not.

gib 14th April 2015 10:13 AM

yes you are

Adenosine 14th April 2015 11:34 AM

I might beo.

Hermit 14th April 2015 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gib (Post 237371)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Adenosine (Post 237118)
Wouldn't they be scroto because they're male? Feminine words are ended in "a".

please tell me you're joking

"Scrotum" is neuter in Latin. The ending, "um", is a bit of a hint. The plural of words ending in "um" is "a". Words denoting females in the singular end in "a". The plural form of those words is "ae". So, don't panic.

Requiem 14th April 2015 01:16 PM

testae

Zeluvia 21st April 2015 08:43 AM

Have you hugged your microbiota today? Or, nearly extinct species we might have really fucked up killing off, Or, Fecal Transplants Anyone?:

http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2...mazonian-tribe

MSG 5th July 2015 02:16 AM

Can't top Ed Yong's recommendation for this article:

https://twitter.com/edyong209/status/616746891632619520
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ed Yong
‏@edyong209
.@Erika_Check's piece on Ebola survivors is a masterpiece. It's hold-your-breath gripping & so beautifully reported. http://www.wired.com/2015/06/ebola-treatment/

http://www.wired.com/2015/06/ebola-treatment/
Quote:

Moigboi’s death hit Moses especially hard. He was such a sweet, selfless kid. He was one of the first nurses to become infected, because he was one of the most dedicated, dutifully caring for patients when everyone else was scared away by the impossibility of the task. “You think that the really good people are going to pull through—that there’s got to be some justice,” Moses says.

Quote:

Moses had been walking down to the hotel lobby, which had Wi-Fi, to check her email. Six o’clock came and went, and she still didn’t know whether the samples were on the plane. Moses tried to stay calm. Her samples had to be loaded in less than an hour or they’d miss the flight. This was where things had gone wrong the last time. Researchers halfway around the world were watching their phones for word that they’d have material to work with. The sooner they could start, the sooner they could save lives. An undotted i or uncrossed t could sink the project. Again.

borealis 5th July 2015 02:26 AM

I'm going to add this to sfs' ebola thread.

ETA: done.

MSG 5th July 2015 02:31 AM

endorsed

Carlsson 5th July 2015 06:18 AM

http://www.news-medical.net/news/201...structure.aspx

MSG 5th July 2015 09:19 AM

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150...th-huge-testes

Quote:

If a man had testicles this big, they would be grapefruit-sized and weigh 4kgs
http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/wwfeatures/1...p/p02w4p00.jpg

Dionysus 6th July 2015 12:21 PM

O M fucking G

:stare:

Dionysus 6th July 2015 02:23 PM

The Guardian article has this

Quote:

“These are not easily explained in terms of prebiotic chemistry. The dark material is being constantly replenished as it is boiled off by heat from the sun. Something must be doing that at a fairly prolific rate.”
to say. Not sure why this can't be explained by there being more aromatic hydrocarbons somewhere along its orbital trajectory than was supposed and that it simply accretes more at aphelion to replace that ablated off at perihelion.

borealis 6th July 2015 02:44 PM

Also has this:

Quote:

Prof Wickramasinghe’s views are regarded as several steps outside the scientific mainstream. He has previously suggested that the SARS virus arrived to Earth from space and that airborne spores that caused rainfall in Kerala to turn a reddish hue had an extraterrestrial origin.
Yes well right then. :unsure:

Dionysus 6th July 2015 02:57 PM

Lol. Seems he was pushing for inclusion of some form of life detecting experiment on the lander but got laughed out of court. Guess he's now determined to prove 'em all wrong.

Requiem 6th July 2015 04:17 PM

In fairness, Hoyle and Wickramasinghe were on the same page here, and nobody really calls Hoyle a loon. He is attached to his hypothesis, for sure, perhaps more vocal about it than Hoyle was, but that's not really unusual in science. Time will tell.

I actually read the paper claiming SARS had features about how it arose which suggest the possibility of extra-terrestrial causes. I'm not qualified to judge the argument, but I never got the crank vibe from it and I do consider myself capable of recognising at least a whiff that.

borealis 6th July 2015 04:29 PM

Mm, okay.

The red rains in India however, turned out to be:

Quote:

The colour was found to be due to the presence of a large amount of spores of a lichen-forming alga belonging to the genus Trentepohlia. Field verification showed that the region had plenty of such lichens. Samples of lichen taken from Changanacherry area, when cultured in an algal growth medium, also showed the presence of the same species of algae. Both samples (from rainwater and from trees) produced the same kind of algae, indicating that the spores seen in the rainwater most probably came from local sources
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_rain_in_Kerala

Botanists. No one ever calls the botanists in first, like they should. :no:

Dionysus 6th July 2015 04:32 PM

Always loved the title astro/exo-biologist. <crickets>

borealis 6th July 2015 04:34 PM

If you're looking for a career that needn't take up a lot of your time, exo-biologist would up to now be a pretty good choice.

MondoVman 6th July 2015 04:42 PM

Death by firework:
http://news.yahoo.com/police-man-sho...135937499.html

here or science thread. really torn.

Dionysus 6th July 2015 04:54 PM

Seems like such an overt Darwin award grab that it should really be disqualified.

Requiem 6th July 2015 05:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 265338)
Mm, okay.

The red rains in India however, turned out to be:

Quote:

The colour was found to be due to the presence of a large amount of spores of a lichen-forming alga belonging to the genus Trentepohlia. Field verification showed that the region had plenty of such lichens. Samples of lichen taken from Changanacherry area, when cultured in an algal growth medium, also showed the presence of the same species of algae. Both samples (from rainwater and from trees) produced the same kind of algae, indicating that the spores seen in the rainwater most probably came from local sources
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_rain_in_Kerala

Botanists. No one ever calls the botanists in first, like they should. :no:

I've never heard of that. It's not what I was referring to anyway, which I'm pretty sure was just blah blah epidemiological patterns or something.

I've got no torch for the guy, I just don't see any difference between him and Hoyle who gets none of this stick but was just as ready to nail his name to any one of these hypotheses the moment it could be made to stick. I'm saying I wouldn't be surprised if the name and the colour of his face is what's making up the difference here, where one is cast as an outright crank and the other is not.

Dionysus 6th July 2015 05:14 PM

Or maybe just that Hoyle is dead. He caught plenty flak while extant iirc.

Eta: find it hard to credit that racism would rear its head in this arena where the awesome and universally respected Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar once strode.

Requiem 6th July 2015 05:24 PM

Fair enough.

Yet the question remains, how do we explain where the Lizard people came from?

Dionysus 6th July 2015 05:49 PM

Lol. According to Icke they came from the constellation Draco but seeing as that isn't a place it's hard to know - gib needs to weigh in here really.

Requiem 6th July 2015 07:44 PM

Ah the old what do Martians call Mars? dilemma, a veritable bog on the epistemological battleground. Stay away.

borealis 6th July 2015 07:53 PM

Hoyle is roundly mocked for his part in this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeopteryx#Controversy

I think most of us don't necessarily toss babies out with bathwater - it's cases of scientists making hard statements on things outside their fields of knowledge which gets them in trouble.

Requiem 6th July 2015 11:44 PM

Someone has to come up with stuff to keep the Dave Hawkins of this world in material.

I do have a little secret love for science cranks, not least because I have twenty odd cranky theories of my own for stuff like how the big bang happened, inflation and expansion. It almost amounts to admiration in a way. The one I best remember online was farsight, the words he used to describe the nice pictures he was imagineering to himself came with such assertiveness tinged with appeal, that 'how can you not see how obvious this is?' pleading on the verge of anger.

There was a guy who signed on to my physics course at the same time as me, shat up the online forum with a debate about new atheist god stuff, lasted to the first assignment. Guy could talk about everything, but he hadn't got a clue when it came to the absolute basics of diddling with equations. Nice thing was the guy he was debating and kind of bullying, a really nice humble guy who happened to have some pretty weird ideas about god stuff and aliens and whatnot, stuck it out even though he really struggled and had to re-take a paper in the second year. He became a decent mate for a while.

borealis 7th January 2016 08:50 PM

3D glasses for Praying!

http://gizmodo.com/scientists-gave-p...pro-1751607948

http://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/...gbuqti4x20.jpg

nostrum 7th January 2016 10:16 PM

you just know she's going to kill you in the next game, right?

borealis 7th January 2016 10:40 PM

There's no preventing that - she kills me just as much when I'm really nice to her in a game. :gonk:

Majiffy 7th January 2016 11:02 PM

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TagPraying Never Forgives
Praying Never Forgets
Praying Is Legion

borealis 14th March 2017 01:21 AM

Back to biology:

Luminous Frog will be my name in my next life.

https://www.newscientist.com/article...ent-amphibian/

Majiffy 14th March 2017 01:42 AM

I like it

MSG 1st April 2017 08:02 AM

this is extremely cool http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cr.../#.WN9OGfmGPIU
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cr...eoburrow-3.jpg

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cr...g-735x1024.jpg

borealis 1st April 2017 12:50 PM

That's a fascinating article, and has me wondering about a small round topped cave I've seen.

spruce 1st April 2017 01:54 PM

...and thus was born, Paleocave of the Luminous Frog, in theaters March 2018.

Majiffy 1st April 2017 08:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 392173)

http://i.imgur.com/avAh5fx.png

MSG 1st April 2017 11:47 PM

Lol

OmicronPersei8 2nd April 2017 12:12 AM

LOL

Majiffy 2nd April 2017 12:25 AM

NUT ROFL

borealis 2nd April 2017 01:21 AM

Putting a person in the photo helps with visualising the size of, for example, ancient claw marks.

spruce 2nd April 2017 01:25 AM

LOL, and the photographer credit is for Heinrich Frank, a guy. :nod:

Majiffy 2nd April 2017 01:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 392262)
Putting a person in the photo helps with visualising the size of, for example, ancient claw marks.

We have better ways of doing that these days

borealis 2nd April 2017 01:55 AM

^Has never been on an expedition in the field with a bunch of science types. Also nobody likes reddit memes, Also:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_L9ggJC7Y_4...avarieties.jpg

Timewave 2nd April 2017 01:58 AM

They keep telling us there is only one type of banana left.:ohdear:

borealis 2nd April 2017 01:58 AM

They lie.

MSG 2nd April 2017 01:59 AM

Once you go green etc.

MSG 2nd April 2017 02:00 AM

FYI the ones third from the left are called ladies' fingers

borealis 2nd April 2017 02:03 AM

They even come in pink. Musa velutina:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7171/6...5c84e1d1_z.jpg

Zeluvia 2nd April 2017 02:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Timewave (Post 392268)
They keep telling us there is only one type of banana left.:ohdear:

What they are telling us is that we are being as stupid now as we were in the 1900's. Cultivating only 1 type of banana.

https://qz.com/164029/tropical-race-...avorite-fruit/

But you can still buy the old banana cultivars. Florida is full of random banana trees of all types growing in yards.

http://www.floridahillnursery.com/ba...ive-tree-p-455

Timewave 2nd April 2017 02:22 AM

:christyes:

Majiffy 2nd April 2017 02:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 392267)
Also nobody likes reddit memes

:colbert:

It's an Imgur meme, damnit.

spruce 2nd April 2017 02:34 AM

bananas are sterile.

borealis 2nd April 2017 02:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Majiffy (Post 392276)
Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 392267)
Also nobody likes reddit memes

:colbert:

It's an Imgur meme, damnit.

:shrug: Lay down with dogs, get up with fleas.

borealis 2nd April 2017 02:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spruce (Post 392277)
bananas are sterile.

only the ones we mostly eat, which are seedless.

Prince Humperdinck 2nd April 2017 12:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Timewave (Post 392268)
They keep telling us there is only one type of banana left.:ohdear:

No. They keep telling us the Cavendish is going away soon.

borealis 3rd April 2017 01:05 PM

Science!

Real headline:

Cats are nice and enjoy spending time with humans, study finds:

Quote:

New research from Oregon State University,*published on Friday in*Behavioural Processes, concludes that cats enjoy human contact more than eating.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017...s-study-finds/
More than eating!

Imp 3rd April 2017 01:33 PM

Do they not have newspapers in Canada?

Majiffy 3rd April 2017 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 392340)
Cats are nice and enjoy spending time with humans, study finds:

More than eating!

Bullshit, my cat loves nothing more than eating.

Except maybe sleeping.

spruce 3rd April 2017 02:05 PM

"50% of cats" (apparently of Catholics... likely fishermen, dressed in green balls of yarn with dangling ends and Christmas lights) (ie. I doubt the 50% of humans were nekid).

MSG 18th April 2017 02:31 AM

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...in-philippines

Quote:

The discovery, Distel adds, sheds light on the evolution of symbiotic relationships between sulphur-oxidising organisms and other creatures, and backs up the possibility that sunken wood might have played a role in how such species ended up in locations such as deep sea hydrothermal vents. “To me it was almost like finding a dinosaur – something that was pretty much only known by fossils,” he said.

MSG 18th April 2017 02:38 AM

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/sc...-a7660456.html




borealis 18th April 2017 02:40 AM

What a weird animal (the shipworm). :oooh:

MSG 18th April 2017 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 394976)
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...in-philippines

Quote:

The discovery, Distel adds, sheds light on the evolution of symbiotic relationships between sulphur-oxidising organisms and other creatures, and backs up the possibility that sunken wood might have played a role in how such species ended up in locations such as deep sea hydrothermal vents. “To me it was almost like finding a dinosaur – something that was pretty much only known by fossils,” he said.

http://i.nextmedia.com.au/popsci/201704-138078.jpg
Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 394982)
What a weird animal (the shipworm). :oooh:


Zeluvia 18th April 2017 03:20 PM

Interestingly enough, on the same youtube page with the badger burying the "CALF" (other word for small cow) there was this:

Spoiler





fate or something

OmicronPersei8 18th April 2017 04:28 PM

:awesome:

MSG 22nd April 2017 03:32 AM

http://i.imgur.com/5G2rT8z.jpg

https://theconversation.com/where-th...t-trees-65893/

Quote:

Once you accept that a common, genetically identical stock can define a tree, then the absolute “winner” for oldest tree (or the oldest clonal material belonging to a tree) must go to the Wollemi Pine (Wollemia nobilis). It may be more than 60 million years old.
:awe:

Jerome 22nd April 2017 04:05 AM

How do they know the carvings were not done a decade ago? Inside caves can manipulate the rock face dramatically in a very short period of time.

MSG 24th April 2017 12:31 AM

state of the art http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-2...ed-qld/7338848

http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/734...x2-700x467.jpg

Quote:

"The way that grooming traps operate is that they use laser sensors to detect different sized animals. We can distinguish animals the size of a cat from larger and smaller animals," he said

"When we have a cat-sized animal walking past them the grooming trap sprays a measured dose of toxin onto the fur.

"Cat's are very fastidious groomers so they lick [the gel] off and walk away and die peacefully. The trap then automatically resets itself with 20 loaded syringes," he said.



borealis 24th April 2017 01:13 AM

:frog:

MSG 13th May 2017 06:34 AM

this is pretty amazing http://www.sciencealert.com/a-new-di...-like-a-statue
http://www.sciencealert.com/images/a...osaur_1024.jpg

gib 13th May 2017 11:38 AM

amazing to think it's in such good condition after 6,000 years

OmicronPersei8 13th May 2017 12:49 PM

That is awesome

Jerome 13th May 2017 02:17 PM

Artists chip away at rocks ...

'SplainBot 14th May 2017 12:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gib (Post 399590)
amazing to think it's in such good condition after 6,000 years

That makes no sense. This fossil is a Nodosaur which lived from the late Jurassic to the late Cretaceous so it is at least 100.5 million years old.

OmicronPersei8 14th May 2017 12:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 'SplainBot (Post 399637)
Quote:

Originally Posted by gib (Post 399590)
amazing to think it's in such good condition after 6,000 years

That makes no sense. This fossil is a Nodosaur which lived from the late Jurassic to the late Cretaceous so it is at least 100.5 million years old.

Pool on this Droids power cells

'SplainBot 14th May 2017 12:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OmicronPersei8 (Post 399638)
Quote:

Originally Posted by 'SplainBot (Post 399637)
Quote:

Originally Posted by gib (Post 399590)
amazing to think it's in such good condition after 6,000 years

That makes no sense. This fossil is a Nodosaur which lived from the late Jurassic to the late Cretaceous so it is at least 100.5 million years old.

Pool on this Droids power cells

I am finding this sentence difficult to parse.

Quote:

verb
verb: pool; 3rd person present: pools; past tense: pooled; past participle: pooled; gerund or present participle: pooling
1.
(of two or more people or organizations) put (money or other assets) into a common fund.
"they entered a contract to pool any gains and invest them profitably"
share (things) for the benefit of all those involved.
also the fragment "this droids" is grammatically incorrect. Do you mean "these droids" or "this droid's"?

Do you want my power cells to be shared amongst the other members?

MSG 20th May 2017 05:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luke Grinham
‏ @LukeGrinham
Got another diagram to add to my collection of best science diagrams. The elusive slurp method of hunting.
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DAMBVXNUwAAAo6K.jpg

also
Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 400523)
nostrum should bring the Snubbsy avatar back.
http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k4...ps2b3ff666.jpg


Majiffy 21st May 2017 03:35 PM

:nod:

MSG 22nd May 2017 10:51 AM

fascinating article https://www.seattlemet.com/articles/...of-urban-crows

Quote:

From the old shopping bag she unsheathed the dead crow and turned it in what little sunshine strained through the fibrous clouds. The black feathers sparkled in the light, and close inspection revealed iridescent blues and purples. She covered it back up with a tan cloth and, with the draped bird lying breast down on her two upturned palms, stepped gingerly onto a patch of grass. She tore the linen away and unveiled the corpse to the gray heavens.

There was nothing at first, just an empty sky. Then, a caw. A crow appeared on a nearby power line. Then another caw and another crow. Suddenly crows flew in from all directions. Their plaintive entreaties soon combined into a chorus. New arrivals joined what quickly grew into a cacophonous dervish of black silhouettes swirling directly above Swift.

It was like sorcery. Conjuring dozens of birds from thin air by simply removing fabric from a body.

This, according to Swift, is what its like to attend a crow funeral—an instinctive ritual that evolved generations ago and was just discovered by humans; Swift coauthored an article on her findings in the journal Animal Behaviour in 2015. The gist: Upon spotting one of its dead, the flock attends to the fallen bird en masse with loud shrieking. Given enough time the throng will mob any predator it thinks is responsible, like say, a human in a Dick Cheney mask, or in a mask like the one Swift had in her bag (the lab affectionately refers to that be-soul-patched fellow as Joe).
https://res.cloudinary.com/sagacity/..._15_z7xvgu.jpg

gib 26th May 2017 11:29 PM

it goes without saying that the corvid twitcher's ultimate tick is the Parliament of Crows

Magicziggy 26th May 2017 11:59 PM




borealis 27th May 2017 01:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gib (Post 401653)
it goes without saying that the corvid twitcher's ultimate tick is the Parliament of Crows

I've seen one. I'm sure I've described it before, in prattle or bird thread.

MSG 27th May 2017 01:44 AM

this one?
Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 243250)
Here's a crow story then - in the mid seventies my bf and I took a camping vacation (on a BMW 650 fyi charlou :) ) in Les Isles de Madeleine, which is an archipelago of tiny islands in the Atlantic, they belong to Quebec. They are strung together with these very long sand bars, up to 15km long, with high dunes on both sides and salt marsh or salt flats in the middle.

So we were waaaaay out offroad on the inner side of the dunes and taking a lunch break. Not another soul in sight. This big flock of crows landed on the salt flat, maybe 200 birds. Then about a dozen of them flew up and settled on the side of a dune. All of them were milling about and 'talking'. Then one crow flew from the large group to the small group, communicated with them for a bit, then flew back to the main group, where more agitated 'conversation' took place. This went on for a good half hour, one crow flying back and forth between the two groups. We were fascinated. It looked exactly as if important matters were being discussed between a leadership group and the main flock. It was still going on when we left. Mysterious, and memorable.


borealis 27th May 2017 01:50 AM

That's the one. :nod:

OmicronPersei8 27th May 2017 03:02 AM

I love watching the crows fuck with the hawks. If it's not outright harassing them in flight, it's screaming to all the other forest creatures "hey ass hole bird wants to eat you"

borealis 27th May 2017 03:13 AM

Have seen that often. They also harass owls trying to get some daytime shuteye.

They yell at my cat often. He's scared of crows (all large birds, really - some predatory bird tried to carry him off when he was smaller and younger) and stays well away from them.

borealis 27th May 2017 03:14 AM

And here's a Hercules beetle life metamorphosis:

https://i.imgur.com/avXzxmh.gif

Jerome 27th May 2017 03:18 AM

Where does all that extra mass come from?

borealis 27th May 2017 03:33 AM

Eating. You can see how huge the grub is before it pupates.

OmicronPersei8 27th May 2017 03:33 AM

Communion wafers, but only the non leavened ones

Jerome 27th May 2017 04:00 AM

Evolutionarily absurd.

What I don't get is how you guys see all these crazy cool things and still believe in evolution.

The disadvantage here is monstrous. Impossible it survived millions of years as the top survivor. Your only retort is, well its here, thus it survived.

borealis 27th May 2017 04:55 AM

It's very cool. The rest of your post - how is the beetle disadvantaged? Most of its life, up to two years, is lived in the grub stage, several instars, living on a rotted wood diet. Then they pupate and change into adults, after which they spend three to six months fighting, mating, and eating fruit. It's a pretty long life for an insect though some live much longer. Like wooly bear caterpillars which freeze in winter and wake to eat up to 14 years before they have enough maturity to metamorphose.

Majiffy 29th May 2017 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerome (Post 401707)
Where does all that extra mass come from?

Quote:

Originally Posted by borealis (Post 401716)
Eating.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerome (Post 401722)
Evolutionarily absurd.

:hmm:

Zeluvia 29th May 2017 09:00 PM

https://timesflowstemmed.com/2013/06...ment-of-crows/

borealis 11th June 2017 02:50 AM

Quote:

The remains of a prehistoric*baby bird*have been found preserved in a 99-million-year-old piece of amber in Myanmar.*
It's one of the most detailed specimens ever discovered —*complete with scales, feathers and claws — in a region*known for its deposits from the Cretaceous period, which lasted from 145.5 to 65.5 million years ago.
http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/technolo...aurs-1.4153298

Good images in article.

Paper: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...42937X17300527

MSG 25th June 2017 04:29 AM

Spiral beehives! http://www.wheenbeefoundation.org.au...n-native-bees/

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/i...3_iGuOKQZyb79S

MSG 23rd July 2017 12:18 AM

https://www.macaulaylibrary.org/app/...Comparison.png
The raised cape of the western male (left) is crescent shaped and unlike the oval shape of the widespread Superb Bird-of-Paradise (right) found throughout most of New Guinea. Left image © Tim Laman ML 62126951. Right image © Ed Scholes ML 458003.

Quote:

“The courtship dance is different. The vocalizations are different. Even the shape of the displaying male is different,” says Scholes. “For centuries, people thought the Superb Bird-of-Paradise in the mountains of the Bird’s Head region was a little different from the other populations throughout the rest of New Guinea, but no one had ever documented its display in the 200 plus years this bird has been known to occur there.”
https://www.macaulaylibrary.org/2017...adise-species/

MSG 23rd July 2017 12:26 AM

it's probably on brand if I say I worry more for the cassowaries than the cassowary lady http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-1...trauma/8694630

Quote:

Ms Marker and her sons grew up with the many cassowaries that passed through their Mission Beach property for 24 years — through birthdays, skinned knees and even two tropical cyclones.

"When nothing else was around, there was no birds, there was no sounds of frogs, no sounds at all, except for the buzzing of angry insects... in walked the cassowaries out of this disaster zone," she says.

But where cyclones failed to wipe out the cassowaries, another introduced animal succeeded in 2015.

One night, Ms Marker was getting ready for bed when she heard dogs running into her property and cassowaries in distress.

Desperate to save the birds, she called for help — but the local council and animal management services weren't available.

The dogs kept coming back, and eventually the cassowary family disappeared.

"Nobody has seen them again and it's been two years now, as if they were alive, they should've come home," she says.
f*cking dogs; f*cking irresponsible dog owners

http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/870...x2-700x467.jpg

MSG 23rd July 2017 12:30 AM

on the other hand http://nautil.us/issue/50/emergence/...-tamed-the-dog

http://static.nautil.us/12719_573658...e83618b69d.png

Quote:

But what would have driven the emergence of these behavioral changes in the wolves? Lyudmila was actively selecting the tamest foxes for mating. Is it plausible to believe that early humans would have actively mated wolves in a similar way? Perhaps they wouldn’t have needed to. Natural selection would likely have favored the wolves who had gained access to such a reliable, human-based food source. The wolves that were friendlier to humans might have found themselves living in close proximity with other such friendlier wolves who were hanging around humans, and they might have selected their own, semi-tame, kind as mates. That would have created the radically new selection pressure for tameness that the fox experiment was applying. And as Lyudmila and Belyaev were seeing with the foxes, this new selection pressure favoring tameness might have been enough to trigger the kinds of changes they were seeing in their tamest foxes. The process would have taken way longer than with Lyudmila’s artificial selection—as, indeed, it’s thought to have with wolves—but the same essential force might have been at play.
http://static.nautil.us/12721_b26be9...d874693e9c.png

borealis 23rd July 2017 12:30 AM

Sad story.

Feral dogs or owned dogs?

NM, I read the article. :(

MSG 23rd July 2017 12:34 AM

probably a bit of both

Quote:

Uncontrolled pet dogs are part of the wild dog problem in Queensland; there are also pig dogs used to hunt feral pigs on banana farms, as well as dog-dingo hybrids.
wild dogs are a problem in a lot of parts of the country - attacking livestock and also wildlife

MSG 23rd July 2017 12:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 406050)
https://www.macaulaylibrary.org/app/...Comparison.png
The raised cape of the western male (left) is crescent shaped and unlike the oval shape of the widespread Superb Bird-of-Paradise (right) found throughout most of New Guinea. Left image © Tim Laman ML 62126951. Right image © Ed Scholes ML 458003.

Quote:

“The courtship dance is different. The vocalizations are different. Even the shape of the displaying male is different,” says Scholes. “For centuries, people thought the Superb Bird-of-Paradise in the mountains of the Bird’s Head region was a little different from the other populations throughout the rest of New Guinea, but no one had ever documented its display in the 200 plus years this bird has been known to occur there.”
https://www.macaulaylibrary.org/2017...adise-species/

one thing the article doesn't mention is the distinctly different head markings on the females, which do have a tendency to get ignored when it comes to discussing birds of paradise

borealis 23rd July 2017 12:53 AM

I noticed that - the females are quite different.

MSG 23rd July 2017 12:57 AM

https://download.ams.birds.cornell.e...62126951/large




borealis 23rd July 2017 01:06 AM

It's hard to look away from those spectacular tail displays.

MSG 23rd July 2017 01:07 AM

:twss:

borealis 23rd July 2017 01:21 AM

Ha!

Maybe there's a bit of dinosaur DNA way back in my genetic inheritance.

nostrum 23rd July 2017 05:52 AM

how come no one has fixed your post yet?

MSG 23rd July 2017 12:10 PM

First do no harm

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DFU3_EeV0AEIHU1.jpg

context http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-2...devils/8543764

MondoVman 23rd July 2017 08:51 PM

Is Australia world champs at destroying native species by bringing in and/or relocating other species? And why did they do that? And are they still doing it?

In the U.S. we have too many (one is too many) idiot pet owners who release non-natives into the wild. Chinese snakes. Burmese pythons. In Florida no less where near every species can survive.

nostrum 23rd July 2017 11:16 PM

They mostly did it to bring a little of home* over. Others were stowaways (e.g. rats, fire ants). Some were incredibly dumb attempts to fix problems - famous one is cane toads my lord did the scientists shit the bed with that one.

We've wised up now and our quarantine is rigorous. It's such a shame.



*blighty back in those days

ETA not sure if we're world champs but because of the geological isolation native species did not evolve with any defence mechanisms for the sorts of introduced predators that arrived. Plus effect on flora by grazing species.

gib 24th July 2017 12:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 406052)
But what would have driven the emergence of these behavioral changes in the wolves? Lyudmila was actively selecting the tamest foxes for mating. Is it plausible to believe that early humans would have actively mated wolves in a similar way? Perhaps they wouldn’t have needed to. Natural selection would likely have favored the wolves who had gained access to such a reliable, human-based food source. The wolves that were friendlier to humans might have found themselves living in close proximity with other such friendlier wolves who were hanging around humans, and they might have selected their own, semi-tame, kind as mates. That would have created the radically new selection pressure for tameness that the fox experiment was applying. And as Lyudmila and Belyaev were seeing with the foxes, this new selection pressure favoring tameness might have been enough to trigger the kinds of changes they were seeing in their tamest foxes. The process would have taken way longer than with Lyudmila’s artificial selection—as, indeed, it’s thought to have with wolves—but the same essential force might have been at play.

Puppies are cute and would also have seemd cute to the people back in flintstones times. Sometimes they would have found a nest of them wouldn't they, the cavemen, ooh look at their little faces, loved it they would have back then, no coffee or other hobbies, what else would they do. Bound to happen.

The ones that bit the kids got shelved, evolution.

MSG 24th July 2017 12:34 AM

that doesn't accord with the analysis in the article which suggested the opposite mechanism

borealis 24th July 2017 12:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nostrum (Post 406112)
They mostly did it to bring a little of home* over. Others were stowaways (e.g. rats, fire ants). Some were incredibly dumb attempts to fix problems - famous one is cane toads my lord did the scientists shit the bed with that one.

We've wised up now and our quarantine is rigorous. It's such a shame.



*blighty back in those days

ETA not sure if we're world champs but because of the geological isolation native species did not evolve with any defence mechanisms for the sorts of introduced predators that arrived. Plus effect on flora by grazing species.

Some of our native species can't even compete against the imported earhworms.

Quote:

North America[edit]
Main article: Invasive earthworms of North America
A total of approximately 182 earthworm taxa in 12 families are reported from the United States and Canada, of which 60 (about 33%) are introduced.[4] Only two genera of lumbricid earthworms are indigenous to North America while introduced genera have spread to areas without any native species, especially in the north where forest ecosystems rely on a large amount of undecayed leaf matter. When worms decompose that leaf layer, the ecology may shift making the habitat unsurvivable for certain species of trees, ferns and herbs. Larger earthworms such as the nightcrawler Lumbricus terrestris and the Alabama jumper, Amynthas agrestis, can be eaten by adult salamanders, which is beneficial for their populations, but they are too large for juvenile salamanders to consume, which leads to a net loss in salamander population.[5]
Currently there is no economically feasible method for controlling invasive earthworms in forests.[6] Earthworms normally spread slowly, but can be quickly introduced by human activities such as construction earthmoving, plantings, and the release of worms used as fishing bait.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthw...vasive_species

gib 24th July 2017 12:47 AM

^^i found it both shallow and also pedantic

borealis 24th July 2017 12:51 AM

Of the 90+ species of herbaceous plants (not including trees) found in my meadowish to black spruce bog back yard, several dozen at least are non-native, mostly from Britain, Continental Europe, and a few from China and Japan. Given the available habitats, I know of quite a few native plants that should appear here, because they occur in the slightly more harsh conditions, same habitats, found in Cape Breton where these invasives have a tougher time thriving.

gib 24th July 2017 12:59 AM

half of the botany here was introduced, i've seen a convincing argument that the northward advance of oaks just after the ice age was helped by humans. Are we going to ban oaks next. I'm all for localism but as everyone who is an expert on the legend of king cnut knows, you can't keep your sandcastles forever.

borealis 24th July 2017 01:05 AM

Nah, there's no stopping them at this point. It's just an observation.

gib 24th July 2017 01:07 AM

MSG wants to stop them. It's his mid life crisis.

borealis 24th July 2017 01:15 AM

Well, some things, you have to at least try. Like Japanese knotwwed.

Quote:

It is listed by the World Conservation Union as one of the world's worst invasive species.[15]
The invasive root system and strong growth can damage concrete foundations, buildings, flood defences, roads, paving, retaining walls and architectural sites. It can also reduce the capacity of channels in flood defences to carry water.[16]
It is a frequent colonizer of temperate riparian ecosystems, roadsides and waste places. It forms thick, dense colonies that completely crowd out any other herbaceous species and is now considered one of the worst invasive exotics in parts of the eastern United States. The success of the species has been partially attributed to its tolerance of a very wide range of soil types, pH and salinity. Its rhizomes can survive temperatures of −35*°C (−31*°F) and can extend 7 metres (23*ft) horizontally and 3 metres (9.8*ft) deep, making removal by excavation extremely difficult. The plant is also resilient to cutting, vigorously resprouting from the roots.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallopia_japonica

Kudzu of the North. I've lived several places where it was just a feature you had to keep from spreading by any means available but could never get rid of.

MSG 24th July 2017 01:21 AM

I hope you're enjoying some fine British ale this evening gib

nostrum 24th July 2017 02:07 AM

I just had a mocha that must've been a triple shot at least. You'd have liked it msg. My heart rate is 120bpm at the mome

Majiffy 24th July 2017 02:15 AM

If my heart rate ever hit 120 I think I'd have cardiac arrest.

MSG 24th July 2017 02:20 AM

I don't like my coffee too strong. Stops you having 3 or 4 more for the day.

Majiffy 24th July 2017 02:22 AM

Only if you're a pussy who can't handle his caffeine you a pussy bro huh u lil puss

MSG 24th July 2017 02:26 AM

my good friend, are you quite sure you want to compare your tolerance for stimulant and depressant drugs with mine

Majiffy 24th July 2017 02:28 AM

:hmmm:

I can probably go toe-to-toe with you on the depressants. But no, I don't wish to compare stimulant usage.

nostrum 24th July 2017 02:51 AM

go on

Majiffy 24th July 2017 03:09 AM

Well I'm on my third night of drinking this weekend but it's CONCACAF gold cup weekend so exceptions are being made

Zeluvia 24th July 2017 04:21 AM

https://theconversation.com/east-afr...ter-zone-73668

SAVE THE BACTERIA !!

borealis 24th July 2017 04:37 AM

Do I have to kill something and eat it raw now?

I'm thinkin' prions right now.

Zeluvia 24th July 2017 08:02 AM

I am pretty scared of prions.

This whole gut bacteria thing is still in it's infancy as far as science goes.

MSG 24th July 2017 08:25 AM

prions are not gut bacteria

MSG 24th July 2017 08:37 AM

come at me you little



nostrum 24th July 2017 08:40 AM

they fall over more than I'd expect

also, disturbing audio

MSG 24th July 2017 09:24 AM

one of these things is not like the other
http://www.sciencemag.org/sites/defa...?itok=fGcRV8Pd

Quote:

If you traveled back in time 150 million years, you might encounter the familiar sight of butterflies sipping nectar—only the insects wouldn’t be butterflies. They would be an extinct group of lacewings called kalligrammatids, which pollinated long-ago relatives of pine trees and cycads, according to a study published online this week in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/...-million-years

Zeluvia 24th July 2017 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 406204)
prions are not gut bacteria

we know that.

Zeluvia 24th July 2017 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 406205)
come at me you little


Defender of the Grass.

borealis 24th July 2017 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 406204)
prions are not gut bacteria

Some prion diseases are contracted by consuming cerebrospinal matter. Some seem to have no known cause. Prions are strange things.

MIL died of CJD.

OmicronPersei8 24th July 2017 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG (Post 406204)
prions are not gut bacteria

yet

borealis 17th August 2017 03:58 AM

A mean metatherian from Central Anatolia:

Quote:

For one, it was big—weighting roughly as much as a honeydew melon, Anatoliadelphys was an order of magnitude more massive than any other northern metatherian mammal. It was also carnivorous, armed with burly jaws lined with rugged premolars, allowing for a powerful bite that could have splintered bone or crunched the shells of armored invertebrates. Based on analysis of Anatoliadelphys’s skeleton, the cat-sized animal was probably an excellent climber and grasper, and would have been at home in the trees.

In life, Anatoliadelphys would have resembled something akin to one of Australia’s quolls crossed with a possum. However, instead of the lovely, wet-eyed pile of fluff staring out at you from a Qantas brochure, Anatoliadelphys would have been more like a mini marsupial tree-hyena, hungrily licking its bone-crushing chops while stalking prey in the canopy.
http://gizmodo.com/ancient-carnivoro...tor-1797874552

https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media...jwcohua60f.jpg

nostrum 17th August 2017 05:38 AM

what a cheerful Anatoliadelphys!

Majiffy 18th August 2017 11:11 PM

Hey do we have an entymolygist (?) on here? I have a bug I'd like identified.

https://ibb.co/egZ8wk

OmicronPersei8 18th August 2017 11:24 PM

cicada

borealis 19th August 2017 12:31 AM

I confirm OP8's identification. A cicada.

nostrum 19th August 2017 12:53 AM

how could jiffy not know :shrug:

nostrum 19th August 2017 12:53 AM

oh wait is it never warm enough in bison to have them

OmicronPersei8 19th August 2017 01:57 AM

A dumb cicada, I've seen / heard a few myself, out of their compatriots major cycles. Mebbe these would be the ones to survive the nkorea nuclear bombardment

Majiffy 19th August 2017 08:14 PM

We get them occasionally but my friend thinks it's a locust

borealis 19th August 2017 08:33 PM

Your friend is dumb; locusts are grasshoppers, that is no grasshopper.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locust

MondoVman 19th August 2017 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Majiffy (Post 408878)
We get them occasionally but my friend thinks it's a locust

My parents (Michigan born) called them locusts, too. Kakada, shamada


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