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Old 25th May 2012, 03:20 AM   #45640  /  #1
Mantisdreamz
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Planting Vegetables

i'm just curious to what everyone's little tricks are for this kind of thing.


Also - when it comes to fertilizing, do you use specific store bought fertilizers? OR, are there any natural fertilizers you use? (i've done little research but heard you can use things like freshly mowed grass cuttings, wood ash, etc).
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Old 25th May 2012, 03:26 AM   #45643  /  #2
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I mostly buy starts because I am impatient. last year I started all sorts of vegetables from seeds, and it was a lot of work. Some plants I had way more starts than I wanted, and some the seeds did poorly and I wound up buying starts at a nursery anyway.

I do like to start my own pole beans, but other than that, I buy starts most years.

I work compost and chicken manure into my garden soil every year. For plants that use up a lot of nutrients (I'm looking at you, tomatoes) I also use liquid fertilizer once a month or so during the growing season.

I rotate my pole bean tipis from plot to plot every year because they do wonderful things to soil.
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Old 25th May 2012, 03:43 AM   #45647  /  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oblivion View Post
I mostly buy starts because I am impatient. last year I started all sorts of vegetables from seeds, and it was a lot of work. Some plants I had way more starts than I wanted, and some the seeds did poorly and I wound up buying starts at a nursery anyway.

I do like to start my own pole beans, but other than that, I buy starts most years.

I work compost and chicken manure into my garden soil every year. For plants that use up a lot of nutrients (I'm looking at you, tomatoes) I also use liquid fertilizer once a month or so during the growing season.

I rotate my pole bean tipis from plot to plot every year because they do wonderful things to soil.
Thanks ob.

Yes - i just bought a few, starts today -- (that's a new term for me).

nothing major, just cherry tomatoes and jalapenos.

so, compost and chicken manure. do you just use regular top soil and mix that stuff into it?

and, when does the growing season take place? (as you can see, i have no experience of this at all).

also - have you ever heard of putting wood ash into the soil?

I did this today with the jalapenos.. because i didn't have any proper store bought fertilizer, but heard that it can add those nutrients needed for the plants.

i can look it up.. but tipis? and how does it do good things for the soil?
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Old 25th May 2012, 04:04 AM   #45648  /  #4
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Originally Posted by Mantisdreamz View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by oblivion View Post
I mostly buy starts because I am impatient. last year I started all sorts of vegetables from seeds, and it was a lot of work. Some plants I had way more starts than I wanted, and some the seeds did poorly and I wound up buying starts at a nursery anyway.

I do like to start my own pole beans, but other than that, I buy starts most years.

I work compost and chicken manure into my garden soil every year. For plants that use up a lot of nutrients (I'm looking at you, tomatoes) I also use liquid fertilizer once a month or so during the growing season.

I rotate my pole bean tipis from plot to plot every year because they do wonderful things to soil.
Thanks ob.

Yes - i just bought a few, starts today -- (that's a new term for me).

nothing major, just cherry tomatoes and jalapenos.

so, compost and chicken manure. do you just use regular top soil and mix that stuff into it?
year 1, I did lasagna gardening. layers of peat moss, compost and topsoil. since then I work more compost and chicken manure into the soil every year.
Quote:
and, when does the growing season take place? (as you can see, i have no experience of this at all).
that varies by location.
Quote:
also - have you ever heard of putting wood ash into the soil?
yes, but I don't use it personally
Quote:
I did this today with the jalapenos.. because i didn't have any proper store bought fertilizer, but heard that it can add those nutrients needed for the plants.

i can look it up.. but tipis? and how does it do good things for the soil?
5 or six straight sticks lashed together at the top. they form a trellis for the beans. beans add a lot of nitrogen to the soil, which is good for next year's planting. so I move the beans to a different plot each year. this year, potatoes are growing in last year's bean plot.

Last edited by oblivion; 25th May 2012 at 04:06 AM.
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Old 25th May 2012, 04:22 AM   #45654  /  #5
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very interesting, thanks. interesting that beans actually ADD nitrogen to the soil around it.

And out of curiosity, do the potatoes seem to being doing well at this point?... or is it too early to tell?
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Old 25th May 2012, 04:26 AM   #45656  /  #6
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the potatoes seem to be doing great. I've dug up some fingerlings a couple times, but I'm going to let the rest of the potatoes grow to bakers size.
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Old 25th May 2012, 04:31 AM   #45658  /  #7
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Mantis, plant hardiness zones.

http://sis.agr.gc.ca/cansis/nsdb/cli...ess/intro.html

ETA: most plants/seeds you buy will have a label that tells you days to maturity and hardiness zone, and usually a bit of other useful info.

ETA2: Less glitchy but not as accurate:

http://www.hgtv.ca/gardening/plantzones

Last edited by borealis; 25th May 2012 at 04:38 AM.
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Old 25th May 2012, 04:57 AM   #45667  /  #8
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Quote:
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the potatoes seem to be doing great. I've dug up some fingerlings a couple times, but I'm going to let the rest of the potatoes grow to bakers size.
how many on average do you usually get? sorry, lots of questions.
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Old 25th May 2012, 05:00 AM   #45670  /  #9
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every potato plant produces about 3-5 lbs of potatoes usually. they are a cool weather plant. it's nearly too hot for them now.
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Old 25th May 2012, 05:00 AM   #45671  /  #10
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Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Mantis, plant hardiness zones.

http://sis.agr.gc.ca/cansis/nsdb/cli...ess/intro.html

ETA: most plants/seeds you buy will have a label that tells you days to maturity and hardiness zone, and usually a bit of other useful info.

ETA2: Less glitchy but not as accurate:

http://www.hgtv.ca/gardening/plantzones
thanks bor! i'm just looking at the last website here.. i'm liking how it tells you the average span you have for no frost to frost weather - may 6 till oct 5.

truthfully, i'm a bit confused about hardiness though.

on the packages of seeds and plants that i got, it went into detail about germination, maturity. but not hardiness.
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Old 25th May 2012, 05:05 AM   #45673  /  #11
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Originally Posted by oblivion View Post
every potato plant produces about 3-5 lbs of potatoes usually. they are a cool weather plant. it's nearly too hot for them now.
hmm. i suppose carrots are the same way? as in cool weather?

my sis has just asked me to start planting carrots as well.
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Old 25th May 2012, 05:09 AM   #45678  /  #12
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they will probably do fine for you. We're getting 90-plus degrees farenheit pretty frequently this month.
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Old 25th May 2012, 05:17 AM   #45680  /  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mantisdreamz View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Mantis, plant hardiness zones.

http://sis.agr.gc.ca/cansis/nsdb/cli...ess/intro.html

ETA: most plants/seeds you buy will have a label that tells you days to maturity and hardiness zone, and usually a bit of other useful info.

ETA2: Less glitchy but not as accurate:

http://www.hgtv.ca/gardening/plantzones
thanks bor! i'm just looking at the last website here.. i'm liking how it tells you the average span you have for no frost to frost weather - may 6 till oct 5.

truthfully, i'm a bit confused about hardiness though.

on the packages of seeds and plants that i got, it went into detail about germination, maturity. but not hardiness.
A lot of them ill say 'zone 6' or whatever. But you can extrapolate from 'days to maturity' and how many likely frost free days you have left when you plant.

Also, October frosts are usually mild enough that you can throw a sheet, some newspaper, a plastic tarp, anything, over any plants still out and not worry. And root veggies usually like a bit of frost.
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Old 25th May 2012, 05:18 AM   #45682  /  #14
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they will probably do fine for you. We're getting 90-plus degrees farenheit pretty frequently this month.
right.. ok. yea, where i am it's much cooler in temp. i mean, at the very most we're at 30 celsius (86). and on average, 25 celsius (75?), during the summer months.
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Old 25th May 2012, 05:49 AM   #45690  /  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mantisdreamz View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Mantis, plant hardiness zones.

http://sis.agr.gc.ca/cansis/nsdb/cli...ess/intro.html

ETA: most plants/seeds you buy will have a label that tells you days to maturity and hardiness zone, and usually a bit of other useful info.

ETA2: Less glitchy but not as accurate:

http://www.hgtv.ca/gardening/plantzones
thanks bor! i'm just looking at the last website here.. i'm liking how it tells you the average span you have for no frost to frost weather - may 6 till oct 5.

truthfully, i'm a bit confused about hardiness though.

on the packages of seeds and plants that i got, it went into detail about germination, maturity. but not hardiness.
A lot of them ill say 'zone 6' or whatever. But you can extrapolate from 'days to maturity' and how many likely frost free days you have left when you plant.

Also, October frosts are usually mild enough that you can throw a sheet, some newspaper, a plastic tarp, anything, over any plants still out and not worry. And root veggies usually like a bit of frost.
yea, i bought a package of seeds for beef tomatoes, and it said something like 75 days. i'll have to double check tomorrow if it says anything about zones. (seem to have misplaced my purse right now, in which package is located!).

thanks for the info about root veggies though. my niece is the one who is obsessed with carrots. so she wants to grow some. i'm not sure, but hope it's not too late in the season to get started on that.
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Old 25th May 2012, 05:52 AM   #45691  /  #16
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Get transplants for the carrots, they take quite a long time to grow to any size.

But it isn't too late for most things. Sometimes planting towards the end of may is best, because nice warm soil and consistently mild nights make most plants grow faster.
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Old 25th May 2012, 06:07 AM   #45693  /  #17
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awesome. yes that was one of my concerns about even getting started on things at all. ...that i had waited too long.


i will definitely look into the transplants. (haven't heard of that, but it gives me something to research come morning).
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Old 25th May 2012, 06:08 AM   #45694  /  #18
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and one more question ... borealis, do you ever use any sort of natural fertilizers?

..i'm wanting to make use of what i have around me, and wondering if that will do. rather than purchasing store bought.
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Old 26th May 2012, 05:46 AM   #45785  /  #19
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borealis, thanks for the websites on the hardiness. i checked them out today, and have a good handle on it now. Seems that i'm in 'Zone 5'... so anyways, neat to take a look at what kind of things best grow in this area. ... as well as the best time of month to do so.


i'll see what happens with what has been planted so far. (cherry tomatoes, radish, carrots, jalapenos).

(instead of carrot transplants i just got seeds).

i have to say, i'm a bit amazed at just how tiny they are, and skeptical that it will actually work! but hopefully will see if anything sprouts up in about 2 weeks or so.
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Old 26th May 2012, 06:01 AM   #45786  /  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oblivion View Post
I do like to start my own pole beans, but other than that, I buy starts most years.
i bought a few seeds of these today, and plan on planting them tomorrow. the seeds are huge (in comparison to others!), and for some reason, seems more assuring that they will do well.

i'm planning on planting them right in the middle of everything, hoping that they'll add a whole bunch of nitrogen to the soil mixture as they grow. (as you mentioned).
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Old 26th May 2012, 03:03 PM   #45797  /  #21
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The tomatos will need way more water than you think they will, unless you have a rainy summer. The jalapenos are a bit fragile outdoors, so the faintest hint of frost or even a cold night, they'll need protection.

My most intensely gardening friend (she grows all of their vegetables and some of their fruit) gave up on planting peppers directly in the garden - she pots them all up so she can move them inside as needed, but she's living in an area which is maybe half a zone colder than you are.
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Old 26th May 2012, 04:18 PM   #45799  /  #22
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This year, I'm growing all my tomatoes and chilies in containers. After a few years of trying out containers versus beds, I've concluded the tomatoes do better that way. It's probably because I have a tendency to plant them too close together in beds. I always think I can squeeze in one more plant. and one more. and one more.

Last year, I got 3 chili plants through the winter by bringing them into the garage on cold nights and putting them out in the sun at every opportunity. this year I plan to fill the garage up!
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Old 26th May 2012, 04:52 PM   #45804  /  #23
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My friend overwinters some peppers as well, but being where she is climate wise, they have to be house plants.

Planting them too close might be the problem. My friend has 11 acres and huge gardens, so lots of room and her field-planted tomato varieties produce tons of fruit. She container plants the cherry tomatos.
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Old 26th May 2012, 11:35 PM   #45820  /  #24
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hmm. Yea, i did plant the cherry tomatoes in a bed. They were 'starters'. And where they are, they receive about 5-6 hours of direct sunlight and then shade with a bit of sun. i'm hoping that's enough.

side note - transplants and starters are the same thing, right?


the jalapenos i did do in a separate pot, so that works out. because it can get down a bit in temperature here.


Ob - the tomatoes in pots, how many seeds on average would you put in a fairly large pot?
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Old 26th May 2012, 11:45 PM   #45821  /  #25
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How large is large? I'd put several in, and then I'd pull all but the most hardy 1 or 2. Tomatoes need a lot of growing space and they really pull the nutrients from the soil. So, they'll stunt each other easily if there are many in a close space. You never know which seeds are going to do the best, so it's a good idea to overplant and then thin them.
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