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Photography For the hobby, the product, the profession and the obsession.

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Old 13th December 2012, 05:31 AM   #73786  /  #51
Teshi
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Short-eared owl:


Ptarmigans:








Kittlitz's Murrelet (lousy pic, but they're critically endangered so I was pleased to spot it):


Oystercatchers:
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Old 13th December 2012, 05:40 AM   #73789  /  #52
Teshi
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Swainson's Thrush:


Ravens:






Lincoln's Sparrow:


Bonaparte's Gull:


Yellow Warbler:
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Old 13th December 2012, 05:44 AM   #73790  /  #53
Teshi
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Common Murres (and some Black-legged Kittiwakes with chicks):


Black-legged Kittiwakes:




Tundra swans:








Pelagic Cormorants:
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Old 13th December 2012, 06:26 AM   #73792  /  #54
Teshi
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Great Horned Owl:


Mallards:






Dark-eyed Junco:


Redtailed Hawk:


Robin:


Black-billed Magpies:




Northern Harrier:


Tufted puffins:


Special bonus Alaskan fowl:


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Old 13th December 2012, 07:14 AM   #73795  /  #55
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Thanks for sharing teshi. And keep snapping. What are you packing there? I'm bemoaning my own gear even though its reasonably mid range but bird shots really show up any deficiencies in the glassware.
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Old 13th December 2012, 07:18 AM   #73796  /  #56
Teshi
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Thanks Just a Canon Rebel with a serviceable but not very crisp 55-250 zoom lens. I'm thinking about buying a nice lens for myself with my holiday bonus.
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Old 13th December 2012, 07:39 AM   #73797  /  #57
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I had a rebel when they first came out. Upgraded a couple of years ago to a 60D but still using the same lenses. Very happy with it. Aussie magpie pic to follow.
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Old 13th December 2012, 07:43 AM   #73798  /  #58
Teshi
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The thing I like about the Rebel is it's super sturdy. I've done terrible things to mine and it still works fine. What do you think about the 60D?

This is the lens I want

I'm looking for a used one, since I'm pretty brutal on camera equipment anyway

Last edited by Teshi; 13th December 2012 at 07:50 AM.
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Old 13th December 2012, 08:10 AM   #73799  /  #59
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60D is great because of the flip screen. It means i can really get down low or up high. It also has great video capability.

Aussie magpies

Magpies are the most common visitors to the garden. Family groups abound at this time of year, the juveniles having grey in the white feathers. This year we have been visited by a family with three young. It's funny watching them bouce over the lawn trying to catch bugs.It's apparent from looking in the birdbook that these magpies are from a race known as the white-backed form of the the Australian magpie which predominates in the south and east. The black backed form is the dominant race and inhabits most other areas.

Adult tucking into some left over rice


Juvenile inspecting the lawn for bugs from the washing line


Distribution: Australian magpie - white backed form

Last edited by Magicziggy; 13th December 2012 at 08:13 AM.
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Old 13th December 2012, 08:12 AM   #73800  /  #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teshi View Post
The thing I like about the Rebel is it's super sturdy. I've done terrible things to mine and it still works fine. What do you think about the 60D?

This is the lens I want

I'm looking for a used one, since I'm pretty brutal on camera equipment anyway
That is the lens I want as well. Out of reach at the moment
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Old 13th December 2012, 08:15 AM   #73801  /  #61
Teshi
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Yeah, it's spendy
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Old 13th December 2012, 08:18 AM   #73802  /  #62
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I spent $100 on a vivitar 2x teleconverter but I really think it was a waste of money. I get the same result by cropping in photoshop.
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Old 13th December 2012, 08:34 AM   #73803  /  #63
Teshi
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There are many sensible things I should really use the money for, like not freezing to death. But what the hell, I like taking photos

Last edited by Teshi; 13th December 2012 at 08:40 AM.
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Old 13th December 2012, 03:57 PM   #73817  /  #64
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I have a Tamron 70-200 f2.8, which does a great job.

I also was just gifted (on my last birthday) a 300mm f4. You be the judge of the job it does...
Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

Most recently, I ordered a 28mm f2.8 (it hasn't arrived yet)

One of the reasons I could afford it, is that it is a 'legacy' lens. With a bit of learning, the right camera body (Pentax has their anti-shake in the body), and the right mods (Katzeye focusing screen which was WELL worth the cash) the cost of making delicious photographs comes WAY down.

If your body doesn't do anti-shake, you can always use old-school techniques...like paying for a better tripod, shielding yourself from wind etc.

I like Pentax because they have been famous for the quality of their prime lenses. I have access to a catalog of lenses forty years deep.

Now I wish I lived somewhere that I could find lots of those old ones...Any big-city garage-salers out there willing to keep an eye out for me?
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Old 19th December 2012, 07:11 PM   #74504  /  #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Almost all warblers (and many other birds) are promiscuous little buggers who merrily interbreed with species close to them ...
This always confuses me. If they are interbreeding to produce viable and fertile offspring, doesn't that mean they are in fact the same species?
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Old 19th December 2012, 07:13 PM   #74505  /  #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teshi View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Almost all warblers (and many other birds) are promiscuous little buggers who merrily interbreed with species close to them. So you may have seen a myrtle/yellow-rumped warbler X some other warbler with more yellow underneath. Also there are variants of many warbler species.
I found out a while ago that gulls are like that too. complete whores, gulls
Are you thinking of ring species like the lesser black-backed/herring gull thing?
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Old 19th December 2012, 07:45 PM   #74506  /  #67
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More Oz tweets

Took these on the cafe patio of The Art Gallery of New South Wales in the Domain in Sydney. The guy was obviously a regular feeder of this pair of what he told me were Rainbow Lorrikeets and was jealously guarding snack time from the other birds. The other two are hugely common but I don't know what they are - anyone?



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Yay from
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Old 19th December 2012, 08:20 PM   #74507  /  #68
borealis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dionysus View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Almost all warblers (and many other birds) are promiscuous little buggers who merrily interbreed with species close to them ...
This always confuses me. If they are interbreeding to produce viable and fertile offspring, doesn't that mean they are in fact the same species?
Are horses and donkeys and zebras the same species? Lions and tigers?
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Old 19th December 2012, 08:36 PM   #74509  /  #69
Dionysus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dionysus View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Almost all warblers (and many other birds) are promiscuous little buggers who merrily interbreed with species close to them ...
This always confuses me. If they are interbreeding to produce viable and fertile offspring, doesn't that mean they are in fact the same species?
Are horses and donkeys and zebras the same species? Lions and tigers?
Horses and donkeys beget infertile mules don't they? Other equid combos I'm not sure about. Likewise, ligers/tigons or whatever - are they fertile? - answers own question - wiki says no. So I guess your birds are just screwing around too but not producing fertile chicks?
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Old 19th December 2012, 08:44 PM   #74510  /  #70
MSG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dionysus View Post
Took these on the cafe patio of The Art Gallery of New South Wales in the Domain in Sydney. The guy was obviously a regular feeder of this pair of what he told me were Rainbow Lorrikeets and was jealously guarding snack time from the other birds. The other two are hugely common but I don't know what they are - anyone?
Spoiler



Noisy miners
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Old 19th December 2012, 08:56 PM   #74512  /  #71
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A racket they do indeed make! Common but handsome birds nevertheless.
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Old 19th December 2012, 09:27 PM   #74516  /  #72
borealis
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Read my posts with the following stupid accent: Canada
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dionysus View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dionysus View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Almost all warblers (and many other birds) are promiscuous little buggers who merrily interbreed with species close to them ...
This always confuses me. If they are interbreeding to produce viable and fertile offspring, doesn't that mean they are in fact the same species?
Are horses and donkeys and zebras the same species? Lions and tigers?
Horses and donkeys beget infertile mules don't they? Other equid combos I'm not sure about. Likewise, ligers/tigons or whatever - are they fertile? - answers own question - wiki says no. So I guess your birds are just screwing around too but not producing fertile chicks?
In reality, it depends. Some mules/hinnies are fertile. Also birds are not mammals. I'm not a biologist, but it seems bird species that are relatively close to each other often produce fertile offspring. You won't find a crow successfully mating with an owl.

Quote:
A female mule that has estrus cycles and thus, in theory, could carry a fetus, is called a "molly" or "Molly mule," though the term is sometimes used to refer to female mules in general. Pregnancy is rare, but can occasionally occur naturally as well as through embryo transfer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mule
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Old 19th December 2012, 10:23 PM   #74523  /  #73
Dionysus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dionysus View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dionysus View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by borealis View Post
Almost all warblers (and many other birds) are promiscuous little buggers who merrily interbreed with species close to them ...
This always confuses me. If they are interbreeding to produce viable and fertile offspring, doesn't that mean they are in fact the same species?
Are horses and donkeys and zebras the same species? Lions and tigers?
Horses and donkeys beget infertile mules don't they? Other equid combos I'm not sure about. Likewise, ligers/tigons or whatever - are they fertile? - answers own question - wiki says no. So I guess your birds are just screwing around too but not producing fertile chicks?
In reality, it depends. Some mules/hinnies are fertile. Also birds are not mammals. I'm not a biologist, but it seems bird species that are relatively close to each other often produce fertile offspring. You won't find a crow successfully mating with an owl.

Quote:
A female mule that has estrus cycles and thus, in theory, could carry a fetus, is called a "molly" or "Molly mule," though the term is sometimes used to refer to female mules in general. Pregnancy is rare, but can occasionally occur naturally as well as through embryo transfer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mule
No, I'm no bio either although I do recall both birds and mammals are amniotes so their embryology is presumably somewhat similar. I had thought, from school biology, that the functional definition of extant species is based on them only being able to produce fertile offspring by mating within their own species. If that is the case, then what you say about sometimes fertile mules would seem to place horses and donkeys right on the breaking edge of that definition.

however, if two birds can breed successfully at any time, then surely by the functional definition we would have to say they belonged to the same species wouldn't we? Our classification as distinct species based on plumage differences or whatever would then seem to be only a convenient labeling system for ornithologists. I dunno - is there a bio in the house?
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Old 20th December 2012, 12:55 AM   #74526  /  #74
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All great stuff and many stunners but this
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teshi View Post
Tundra swans:
is satisfying on so many levels. Ravishing!
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Old 20th December 2012, 09:39 AM   #74553  /  #75
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Originally Posted by Dionysus View Post
A racket they do indeed make! Common but handsome birds nevertheless.
Actually they are quite a pest these days, although they're a native bird. Noisy Miners specialise in living on the edge of eucalypt forests and chasing all the other birds out of their territory, but because so much forest cover has been removed by human action, especially west of the Great Dividing Range, there are a lot more "edges" - like trees lining roads and fence-lines, or in cleared paddocks or urban parks and gardens. So the same human-influenced conditions that have brought species like Regent Honey-eaters and Swift parrots to their knees have profited Noisy miners greatly.
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